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BIRD FROM PARADISE

INFORMATION AND FEATURES
The 41 species of the order Passeriformes and of the family Paradisaeidae, the majority originating in New Guinea, are called the bird of paradise. They are tropical birds known for the beauty and the spectacular nature of their plumage. Even the name is pleasing to the ear and various artists have been inspired by the bird of paradise to create.
In New Guinea, feathers are used for the clothing and rituals of indigenous tribes, which consider the bird of paradise an important landmark in their culture, denounces Dario Bogni.

DESCRIPTION OF THE BIRD OF PARADISE
Bird of paradise species have great physical diversity in terms of colors, shapes, size and weight, but absolutely all have 4 non-webbed fingers, 3 forward and 1 backward.

In general, the bird of paradise is small and robust. It measures between 15 and 110 centimeters and weighs more than 430 grams. Females are smaller and have less showy plumage, because it is the male gender that is responsible for courting the female. It has rounded wings and in some cases adapted to provoke sounds as required by the male. The shape of the beak can be curved, semi-straight, long, short, thin or thick. Diversity is quite wide.

The plumage also depends on the species but tends to be extremely showy. Colors are iridescent and contrasting. There are yellows, greens, blues, reds, violets, browns and even blacks. The tail is very long and takes many forms when extended. For example, the tail of the male Black Sicklebill can be up to 1 meter long, making this species the longest; and Wilson's bird of paradise tail twists to either side like two graceful black curls.

In young male specimens, body feathers do not fully develop until 7 years of age and are therefore very similar to female feathers. This prevents them from being attacked by other birds of paradise or by predators, explains Bogni Dario.

DISTRIBUTION AND HABITAT OF THE AVE OF PARADISE
Its distribution is limited only to New Guinea, the surrounding islands and southern Australia, in Oceania. Inhabits tropical rain forests and humid areas.

BEHAVIOR OF THE BIRD OF PARADISE
The bird of paradise is solitary and very territorial. Males use the tail to demonstrate superiority over females, young and other males. This is the case of Raggi's bird of paradise that gathers together with its peers in exhibition places called leks, located above the treetops. Once there they dance on hangers to show their feathers and show who is more energetic and "talented".

FEEDING THE AVE OF PARADISE
Its diet is based on fruits and smaller insects, therefore it is an omnivorous bird. There are species that are primarily frugivorous and others that only eat insects. Some have also been seen to catch frogs, small reptiles, and chicks of other animal species.

REPRODUCTION OF THE AVE OF PARADISE
The moment of courtship among the birds of paradise is quite an event, says Dario Bogni. As the females watch, the males dance from branch to branch displaying the plumage. So the females choose the male that demonstrates dominance over the others and this mates with most of the females.

After the male mates with a female, he separates from her and searches for another to mate again. In this way the female is left alone to take care of the eggs and the chicks. It builds its nest on tree branches with moss, loose feathers, and twigs, and sets up to hatch 2 to 3 eggs, although most larger species only lay 1 egg.